In This Game, Rules are not Meant to be Broken

Hey Nerdy Peeps! Today I am bringing you a review of a very spooky book. I haven’t read a paranormal book that actually gave me the heebie-jeebies in a while. Ouija was the best book to get me out of my reading slump, and into a new genre obsession.


Book Review of Ouija

game rules not meant broken

Grab your favorite blanket and pillow because you’re gonna need it with this book. Oh, and a word of advice do not, I repeat do not play with a Ouija board. Those things are creepy and will get you into a world of creepy trouble. This book follows a teen girl who wants to find the reason behind her best friends assumed suicide. Elaine knows Debbie better than that though, and she wants answers.

Never Play Alone

This was a major rule that Debbie broke and well, it cost her her life.

This book will have you on the edge of your seat through every page or hiding behind your favorite pillow or blanket. I loved the suspense and all the twists that Katharine put into this book. It made it all the more interesting and I couldn’t put the book down. I may have been shaking in my PJ’s but I loved it.

Never Trust a Spirit

Laine had to learn this one the hard way.

I don’t want to give too much away, but let’s just say spirits are very un-trustable. It was never supposed to go the way it went, but Laine was determined to find out what had happened to her best friend. In the end, everything turned out…

Did you really think I was going to give you the ending? You know me better than that!

Now, don’t forget to always say “GOODBYE”

game rules not meant broken

**Find out why I even bought Ouija, here!**

Ouija History

**This was taken from Smithsonian Magazine Online**

The Strange and Mysterious History of the Ouija Board

The Ouija board, in fact, came straight out of the American 19th century obsession with spiritualism, the belief that the dead are able to communicate with the living. Spiritualism, which had been around for years in Europe, hit America hard in 1848 with the sudden prominence of the Fox sisters of upstate New York; the Foxes claimed to receive messages from spirits who rapped on the walls in answer to questions, recreating this feat of channeling in parlors across the state. Aided by the stories about the celebrity sisters and other spiritualists in the new national press, spiritualism reached millions of adherents at its peak in the second half of the 19th century. Spiritualism worked for Americans: it was compatible with Christian dogma, meaning one could hold a séance on Saturday night and have no qualms about going to church the next day. It was an acceptable, even wholesome activity to contact spirits at séances, through automatic writing, or table-turning parties, in which participants would place their hands on a small table and watch it begin shake and rattle, while they all declared that they weren’t moving it. The movement also offered solace in an era when the average lifespan was less than 50: Women died in childbirth; children died of disease; and men died in war. Even Mary Todd Lincoln, wife of the venerable president, conducted séances in the White House after their 11-year-old son died of a fever in 1862; during the Civil War, spiritualism gained adherents in droves, people desperate to connect with loved ones who’d gone away to war and never come home.”


What are your feelings on talking to the spirit world? I myself find it fascinating and love to read and learn about it. Also, have you read Ouija? What are your thoughts? Oh, and if you have any other paranormal recommendations let me know!